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Thursday, December 14, 2017

Call for members' support for incident reporting scheme as we log a 22% increase in tanker incidents in 2007

The number of tanker incidents increased in 2007 by 22% to 326 incidents. This compares with an increase of 65% in 2006 over 2005. Unfortunately both the number of fatalities and the amount of pollution increased as well.

 

The number of incidents during the first part of 2008 indicates that the number of incidents may be declining. The projection of the number incidents for this is below 290 incidents, which would be a decline of more than 10% compared to 2007.

 

 

2008 until 27 May

2007

2006

2005

2004

TCLs

1

2

2

1

2

Pollution

2

17

10

17

15

Fatalities

33

61

40

26

65

Type cause

 

Total

%

 

Total

%

Total

%

Total

%

No

%

Collision/contact

33

29%

89

27%

90

34%

53

33%

42

30%

Grounding

19

17%

65

20%

46

17%

33

20%

26

19%

Fire/Expl.

10

9%

30

9%

24

9%

15

9%

31

22%

Hull&machinery

34

30%

96

29%

73

27%

53

33%

23

16%

Misc/unknown

17

15%

44

13%

31

12%

5

3%

17

12%

Hostilties

2

2%

2

1%

2

1%

2

1%

1

1%

Total

115

100%

326

100%

266

100%

161

100%

140

100%

 

 

 

2006

 

2005

2004

 

dwt range

No tankers

Total

%

Rate

Total

%

Total

%

Total

%

Total

%

Below 10,000

8,118

47

41%

0.006

142

44%

137

0.515

69

43%

32

23%

10-29,999

1,310

23

20%

0.018

55

17%

34

0.128

34

21%

34

24%

30-99,999

2,481

31

27%

0.012

79

24%

64

0.241

40

25%

51

36%

100,000+

1,386

14

12%

0.010

50

15%

31

0.117

18

11%

23

16%

Total

13,295

115

100%

0.009

326

100%

266

1.000

161

100%

140

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Age

No tankers

Total

%

Rate

Total

%

Total

%

No.

%

No

%

Unknown

 

4

3%

 

3

1%

12

5%

 

 

3

1%

Built 1970s

3,102

16

17%

0.005

35

11%

35

13%

25

19%

31

12%

Built 1980s

2,870

23

20%

0.008

71

22%

68

26%

51

40%

38

14%

Built 1990s

3,401

30

26%

0.009

108

33%

81

30%

56

43%

39

15%

Built 2000s

3,922

42

37%

0.011

109

33%

70

26%

29

22%

28

11%

Total

13,295

115

100%

0.009

326

100%

266

100%

129

100%

152

100%

Rate = Number of incidents per share of fleet by dwt or age range.

 

The reports we have received contain too little information to make a comprehensive analysis with regard to root causes or to conclude on why the number of tanker incidents – particularly the number of engine failures – is increasing strongly. One reason is increased trade, but this can only explain part of the increase.

 

We know that shipping has been expanding strongly during this decade, not only in the tanker sector, but in all shipping sectors. Such a major expansion of the fleet is bound to place a strain on resources, not least human resources, with education and training of both ship and shore personnel running to keep up. Figures from the P&I Clubs show strong increases in the cost of claims – although this may, however, be related to cost increases as much as to increases in the number of incidents.

 

To better understand the causes of tanker incidents, INTERTANKO’s Confidential Information Reporting System was established by the Vetting Committee and has reported to Council meetings. Members were encouraged to submit details of major incidents to the Secretariat, similar to the way in which incidents are reported to the oil majors. INTERTANKO established a specific e-mail address to facilitate this, as follows incidents@intertanko.com

 

To date, however, we have only received one such report. INTERTANKO’s Vetting Committee is therefore in the process of developing a simple one-page form that may be used as a basic reporting format. It will also aim to standardise the reporting format and thus make it simpler and easier for members to submit such (confidential) reports to INTERTANKO. Members are encouraged to send the reporting format they use themselves to the INTERTANKO office.

 

The concept behind this is simple. Information submitted to the database will be treated in confidence to the member and the vessel, but will enable INTERTANKO to build an incident database, which should be in line with that used by the industry in general to make the reporting a part of the normal ISM routines and to enable members to benchmark their own performance against the performance of the pool.

 

Attention should also be given to the decision of the IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee at MSC84. The Committee noted that guidance was required to encourage the reporting of near-misses so that remedial measures can be taken to avoid recurrences; as well as guidance on the implementation of near-miss reporting in accordance with the requirements of section 9 of the ISM Code with respect to the reporting of hazardous situations. Investigating near-misses is an integral component of continuous improvement in safety management systems. This benefit can only be achieved when seafarers are assured that such reporting will not result in punitive measures. Learning lessons from near-misses should help to improve safety since near-misses can have the same underlying causes as losses.

 

The barriers to reporting actual misses may be overcome by, for instance, encouraging a “just-culture” in the company which covers reporting.

 

For INTERTANKO to take this project further we need your guidance, and we would appreciate any comments.

 

Contact: Erik Ranheim